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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
rankings were based on e tests of more than half a million 15-year-olds. the u.s. education secretary arnie duncan calling it stagnation. but before we talk about how to fix the problem, let's look deeper. there might be a lot less here than meets the eye. they're broken down in connecticut, florida, and massachusetts. in connecticut and massachusetts, two of the richest states in the union were students generally perform better than the worldwide average. the policy substitute said that america lags in social testing. if you were to correct for their massive income inequality, the performance is better than it appears. consider that the top issuer in all three categories was shanghai, a result that gave rise to headlines proclaiming china has having the smartest students. they are just 1.7% of china's population. country, essentially forces many of the children of poor workers to leave shanghai for high school. while testing was done three years ago in china's rural areas, the chinese government only allowed the release of shanghai's scores. it underlies almost every conversation we have a
and republicans that education is the solution to the problem. if we just figure out better to educate our poor kids we could reduce the inequality. and the president today acknowledged that may not be enough. >> the outcomes we're having today, the health care, the budget, reforming our financial systems, all of these things will have a practical effect on americans, i am convinced the decisions we make in the next few years, will determine whether or not america will be the country where children can grow up and have opportunities that are real. >> i have seen you talk about your work in education as fundamentally driven towards precisely the kinds of goals the president talks about today. reducing inequality. expanding social mobility. and i wonder what your take is on how much of that can be achieved through education, while we have seen outside the schools such a massively expanding amount of poor people. >> yeah, i think part of the problem that we have in the debate today is that people think that you either have to solve the problem of poverty through social programs or it is all about
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. is what makes us different. we take the time to get to know you and your unique health needs. then we help create a personalized healthcare experience that works for you. and you. and you. with 50 years of know-how, and a dedicated network of doctors, health coaches, and wellness experts, we're a partner you can rely on -- today, and tomorrow. we're going beyond insurance to become your partner in health. humana. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. [ m'm... ] great taste. [ tapping
. it caught fire. they began to educate and send their anc representatives out of the country and all over the world talking about what was going on. i introduced legislation in the california state assembly where i was serving to divest all of our pension funds from businesses that were doing business in south africa. that caught fire. and investment started all over the united states in various legislatures. the young people on the college campuses started to march and rally. transafrica forms and began to sit in at the south african embassy. we closed down the south african council here in los angeles, so the movement took hold. and we added to that the sanctions, the rallies, the protests, the education about what was going on, and it brought apartheid to an end. >> yeah, i think the key point if that is the grass-roots movement of divestment as the predicate to sanctions. it became the national government's policy version of what universities and cities and states and all sorts of cities were working on on a grass-roots level. i want to bring in thomas frank, author of "the wrecking c
at a good education or that guy over there who i'm not related to has a chance at a decent job and retirement, i'm going to be better off. i'm going to be lifving in a society that is more cohesive and, you know, going to create the kind of future for our kids that we all want. and that, more than anything, is at the core of the debate that i've been having with the republican party over the last several years. it's not just the details of the affordable care act or, you know, the minimum wage. because as i said yesterday in the speech, if you've got better ideas for achieving the same goal, put them out there. i'm not wedded to one particular way of doing things. but the central argument i have is, we do have an a obligation to each other and there are some things that we can do together and, in fact, the big challenges that we have, whether it's immigration, climate change, an economy that works for everybody, i am profession our education system, making college more affordable, competing in the world economy, dealing with questions of war and peace, those are not things that
on to become a lawyer after a rare education in a white supremacist nation that was explicitly ordered around the oppression and degradation of the black majority of its people. mandela co-founded the youth league of the african national progress dedicated to equal rights and overthrowing the system of apartheid, the racial segregation upon which the republic of south africa had been founded. for this activity, the government armed with a vast secret police branded mandela an enemy of the state. mandela was forced into hiding. in a stunning 1961 broadcast, his first televised interview, the 42-year-old activist spoke with itn's brian woodlake. >> i asked him what it was that the africans really wanted. >> the africans require, want the franchise on the basis of one man, one vote. >> do you see africans being able to develop in this country without the europeans being pushed out? >> we have made it very clear in our policy that south africa is a country of many races. that there's room for all the races in this country. >> mandela emerged from hiding and would be tried for treason. mandela was
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> we're back with jj ramberg, josh barrow and robert reich. j.j., whether the drones materialize or not, i think it's kind of a pr stunt, frankly, but the future of retail is stuff coming to you rather than you going to stuff. >> exactly. you went into the break asking what does it look like, right when we don't have any stores anymore? and i can tell you what it looks like, because we've spent the last year on my show going around main street usa and asking small businesses how they're doing. and town after town, what we saw was there were these agricultural, industrial towns, factories moved away, main street kind of disappeared. then it built up, big box stores came in, took all the business and then main street went down again. crime, you know, boarded-up store fronts. and now, the main streets that are doing well are working together to try and market themselves as a whole. come to main street because we are helping our community. it's almost like a tourist destination. >> that's interesting. and one of the things you've
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)